Tuesday December 21, 2004 - 11:58 AM
Central Florida - Wekiwa Springs State Park, Rock Springs State Reserve, Lower Wekiwa River Preserve
Central Florida - Wekiwa Springs State Park, Rock Springs State Reserve, Lower Wekiwa River Preserve
Central Florida - Wekiwa Springs State Park, Rock Springs State Reserve, Lower Wekiwa River Preserve
Central Florida - Wekiwa Springs State Park, Rock Springs State Reserve, Lower Wekiwa River Preserve
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Central Florida - Wekiwa Springs State Park, Rock Springs State Reserve, Lower Wekiwa River Preserve
Central Florida - Wekiwa Springs State Park, Rock Springs State Reserve, Lower Wekiwa River Preserve
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WSSP Oct. 7, 2003
Submitted by: Dick Ashby
The Park Museum will soon get more displays, animals, artwork and some new paint.
The museum, which first opened Memorial Day 1995, is generally open every Saturday and Sunday for part of a day. It is manned by volunteers who love spending time in the Park and enjoy talking with visitors. If you would like to be a museum volunteer, send us an email or stop in the museum.
Volunteers work three hour shifts and scheduling of volunteers is done in three-month periods. Volunteers generally work a shift a month. But scheduling is flexible allowing volunteers to work when it is convenient for them. The building space was an old concession area. Volunteers removed all the old fixtures, built walls and displays, painted, acquired donations of animals (taxidermy), butterfly displays, bones, shells, Indian arrow heads and other assorted item for displays. The CSO then paid for several additional animals to be prepared for display by a taxidermist. Almost all the animals in the museum were killed by cars.
WSSP 09/29/03
Submitted by: Richard Poole
As the building boom rolls on across Central Florida, more and more land is being converted to residential and commercial uses.
Where forests are leveled or compromised, birds are concentrated in the remaining prime areas, forced onto less desirable habitat, or disappear from the local scene. Three classes of birds utilize Wekiwa Springs State Park. Permanent residents like the Northern Cardinal and Carolina Wren live the entire year at Wekiwa, whereas migrant birds stay only a few days or weeks, e.g. the American Redstart and the Black-throated-Blue Warbler. Some birds remain at WSSP for the entire winter, among them the Yellow-rumped Warbler and the Hermit Thrush. To track bird population changes, we initiated our bird banding project in the fall of 2002 and will continue until the fall of 2007. Depending upon weather, mist nets will be opened shortly after sunrise and closed before noon, once or twice weekly. Data over the five-year period should give indications of weight fluctuations during the stay of these birds, site fidelity and return rate of birds. Age, sex and weight will be recorded for each capture if possible. Birds will be banded with uniquely numbered US Fish and Wildlife Service bands.
Although the primary interest of our bird banding volunteers is an area of WSSP that is undergoing forest restoration, the information that we compile will lead to better methods for managing the remaining forests across the entire state of Florida. Please join us for an invigorating morning in the forest ... volunteer workers and observers are welcome. For dates, locations and directions, email catbird@cfl.rr.com.
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Wekiva Wilderness Trust, Inc.
1800 Wekiwa Circle | Apopka, Florida  32712
Phone: 407.263.8030  - Fax: 407.772.8779
Copyright 2002 - Wekiva Wilderness Trust, Inc.


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